Plex on Pop_OS with external USB files

[UPDATE, LATER: This all fell apart. I need a dedicated linux box, not a triple-boot Mac from 8 years ago.]

It’s about file permissions, yeah, but the thing that eluded me for a few hours until I hit on this post, was that it’s also about mount points and security rules.

You gotta get the UUID of your ”plex files” partition(s) and edit /etc/fstab to have your system mount it/them somewhere other than the default.

I think the example the Plex employee uses in his walkthrough is unfortunate because on my Pop_OS drive /media is already used by the system. I created a new folder at the root level called /plexmedia, chmodded it to 755, and listed it as the mount point for a partition on my external USB drive. When the system rebooted, suddenly the Plex server could see all my subfolders. Hooray.

NOTE: Before figuring this out, I had already tried the following; now I don’t know if they were unnecessary fiddling or if they were also a needed part of the solution:

(1) The drive and media files were originally part of a Mac setup. The drive was formatted HFS+, journalled. I took the drive back to a Mac and turned off journalling using diskutil.

(2) Once I’d done (1) I could mount the drive in Linux in a write-able fashion, and chowned the entire thing to user plex and group root. (As a read-only volume they had been showing up as ”503: root” where 503 is the ID of my everyday Mac user. I read some tricky posts about creating a Linux user with a matching ID and ”stealing” those ”orphan” files, but I’m glad I didn’t go down that route because the security/default-mount thing would still have been in the way… [I do think this mattered, because once I discovered the Plex post linked above, I didn’t need to do the 755/644 stuff; it just worked.]

Advertisements

Things I read in May 📚

Non-fiction (tech):

Fiction:

  • Home and The Night Masquerade, Nnedi Okorafor. Books 2 and 3 of this series. I said of the first, “A little thin on plot but a refreshing character…” The plots got more interesting. I liked ‘em.
  • The Raven Tower, Ann Leckie. I liked this, too. I gather this is a continuation of a fantasy world she’s already built in short stories over the years; it was all new to me.
  • Revenger, Alastair Reynolds. I didn’t finish this until June but I was still on vacation so it counts in May. A little different than most of his stuff but pretty good. (I don’t love it when he leans into ultraviolence; happens in Revelation Space books here and there, too. I guess I’m just a squish.)
  • Permafrost, Alastair Reynolds. An unexpected time-travel thing from AR. Novella-length maybe? I read it on my Kindle while on vacation. My complete Goodreads review: “Good, but Connie Willis has mined this vein so deeply it’s hard not to compare.”

In May I said, “I got 10% of the way through an absolute doorstop of a fantasy novel.” I ran out of newer books while travelling, and plowed through another 20% or so of The Dragonbone Chair. Having put this much time into it, I’ll probably finish it, but it really is such a pastiche of better work that I won’t mind putting it off.